Physical Activity And Diabetes : Impact of Physical Activity on Diabetes


Physical activity and diabetes. Learn to use physical activity to prevent and relieve the effects of diabetes. What is the role of physical activity in the treatment of diabetes? When analyzing this topic, it is important to recognize that physical activity has been used to treat diabetes for thousands of years. In addition, even after isolating insulin in 1922, exercise was considered along with diet and insulin as an important part of the treatment regimen for diabetes.

Before delving into how physical activity can affect the management of diabetes, first I want to see the general relationship between physical activity and the risk of developing diabetes. Data from a series of studies have provided convincing evidence of the role that regular exercise can play in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. In one study, the risk of type 2 diabetes increased as levels of physical activity decreased and It increased the time I spent watching television. In another study, it was shown that people with low levels of free time and physical activity had a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. While the lowest risk of type 2 diabetes was observed in the most active group. Those individuals who showed moderate levels of physical activity demonstrated marked reductions in disease risk compared to the less active group. This finding is consistent with what we have talked about in previous programs, and that is that you can obtain numerous health benefits by doing moderate physical activity on a regular basis.

Exactly how physical activity helps to transport blood sugar to muscles. When physical activity is performed, the muscles contract and, in doing so, an effect similar to insulin is created. What this means is that when you are physically active, the glucose intake in your muscles increases 7 to 20 times compared to resting conditions. Within the cell, muscle activity individualizes what are known as glucose transporters to migrate to the cell membrane and introduce glucose. Because muscle activity produces an effect similar to insulin, less insulin is needed to move glucose to the muscles in an inverse manner during and after skeletal exercise. The muscle shows an increase in insulin sensitivity available. What does this mean for a given level of insulin? More glucose can be moved in the blood to the muscle and this effect can last from several hours to a few days. With training, the sensitivity to insulin increases due to the increase in the total content of glucose transporters and the stronger effect of insulin at the cellular level. This increase in insulin sensitivity is what makes physical activity so useful in treating people with diabetes, as it reduces the need for insulin while helping to lower blood glucose levels to more normal

Regular exercise and physical activity can improve the health and quality of life of type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Regular aerobic and resistance training combined with dietary therapy can result in better aerobic function, favorable profile changes of cholesterol, decreased weight and blood pressure, and greater lean body mass. In addition, daily physical activity can help improve the psychological state of the diabetic by increasing self-esteem and decreasing depression and anxiety.

Regular physical activity can lower the insulin requirements of well-controlled type 1 diabetics by 30 to 50 percent. With each exercise session, the improvement in insulin sensitivity may last 1 or 2 days before returning to pre-exercise values. This discovery highlights the importance of being active every day, so you can make the most of the improved insulin sensitivity that comes from participating in unique episodes of physical activity and exercise.

Before starting an exercise program, the diabetic must undergo a comprehensive medical examination, since intense exercise can aggravate eye, kidney or nerve problems that may already exist.

Video credits to Healthy Lifestyle Choices YouTube channel





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    Physical Activity And Diabetes : Impact of Physical Activity on Diabetes

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